African Roots: Ideological Cohesiveness

The ability to design a cohesive culture is not dependent on material possessions, but rather on the ideological core of the people in that culture. An ideological core can be best described as a set of values developed in the very early stages of the group’s history. The ideological core or IC are those shared facts that shaped the identity of a people. The ideological core is important because it sets boundaries based on shared experiences and protects against outside influences. Some common misconceptions are that it’s possible for people to unite while practicing different religions. This is a false because All religions have their own rules of engagement, values, and codes of conduct including business and economics. This reality makes it difficult to unite despite our differences because all human behavior is rooted in thinking patterns that are shaped by past events as well as present experiences, all of which directs our decisions, our politics, and our behaviors.

According to Marimba Ani, the author of Yurugu Am African Centered Critique of European Cultural Thought and Behavior, ” An ideological Core is the logos of all culture. It’s germ seed of all and the matrix of a cultural identity”.

As African Americans our ideological core begins and ends in Africa, because it’s in Africa that we evolved as a species, it’s where the first civilizations rose to power, developed, and decayed. It’s where business formed, where the first families flourished, and where the first religious institutions organized.  It’s where we the oldest written moral and ethical codes developed, and it’s where our heritage blossomed. Therefore as a group, we should never allow anyone to seduce us into believing that our values are in some twisted way are dependent on how much money we can produce, so that we can live a lifestyle of leisure time activities or that the accumulation of material possessions determines our worth as people.  Instead, we must never forget materialism is a product of 500 plus years of European brutality,  never forgetting that true wealth is rooted in our culture, natural resources, and our Morality.

We can’t afford to allow the European marketplace to dictate our moral consciousness. We must unite under one ideological core based on morals and rules that govern the codes of conduct of our community.

Nyah Amara-VOF

Why We Need African Studies  By Amos Wilson-Transcribed from lecture “History As An Instrument of Power”.

So, we are talking again about ‘why study history? So a lot of people think history is just a study of dates you see and reading information about things that happened in the past. That is certainly not the case. History in the human mind is always present. The past is always present. Things that happened to you at one year old, at two year old, when you were three years old are operating in your right at this moment. And the way you react to other people, the kind of tastes you have, the desires you have, the kind of love relations you seek and all of those kinds of things, are to a great extent determined by your experience before you were three or four years old. In other words, that experience, those experiences between birth – an actually in the womb itself – but between birth and two or three or four years old operate right now to colour your perception of other people, of yourself; to determine to a good degree the nature of your interaction with other people. In other words then, the past is not something that’s dead and gone, and dropped off in your mind, it operates right here at this very moment, this very second; and it will operate until the day you die. (It means) the same thing occurs in the history of a race.

 If you look at the history of a race the way you look at an individual, those experiences that happened to us two and three hundred years ago are not dead and gone by a long shot. The ways we relate to other people many of our political goals today, many of our social goals right now, many of the things that we desire to achieve as a people, come from our experience during slavery. Many of us are sitting here right now wanting to assimilate with white folk, wanting to be what? Many of us are struggling with feelings of inferiority and all those kinds of things. Where did you think that started? You think it started here today? It started as soon as we hit the shores of this country. And so the experience of ourselves as a group is alive in us. Where else can history be alive but in the minds of people? If people were not in existence, what would be the point? We wouldn’t even have to be discussing history. Another indication of the importance of history of course is the fact that those who rule over us and those who dominate us have worked very hard at distorting our history; and at hiding our history from us; and at falsifying our history. So if history was not that important to everyday life, to real life and to concrete activities, why then has this nation and the people who rule it work so hard to destroy African history; Why are they resisting the inclusion of African history and African culture in the educational structure; If they think that inclusion is purely harmless from their point of view. You see? 

In other words then, we need to gain a new appreciation of history and need to recognize that history is always present and that to a great extent if we are to change our present behaviour, that if we are to change the future then we must change the past and change our relationship to it. And therefore the falsification and mislabelling of black consciousness deals with why we should study history; it deals with history as mythology. And you can recognize in your everyday behaviour: If you’ve been given the wrong history about a person how that can change your behaviour toward that person. 

What if people have the wrong history about you; They’ve been given the wrong information about you. If you act with other people based on their history of the other person, you see if people want to change the nature of people’s relationship they will often the falsify the history of one or both of those persons, knowing that one or both of those persons are going to interact with each other differently depending on their history or that sense of the history of the individual. This goes on with groups ladies and gentlemen.

 That’s why those in power then rewrite history. Because in rewriting history they rewrite the person’s perception of himself whose history they’ve rewritten. They also then change that person’s behaviour and relationships with other people given the history that they’ve come to believe; and they also change the way that other people interact with those people, you see, based on the history that they’ve learned about the people. You see, that’s why any group has to take command of its history  to make sure that it projects the kind of history that operates in its best interest; it cannot let another people write its history and let another people determine the nature of its history. And it must also know the history of other people as well if it is to maintain self control and self determination.
But history is not a mere remembrance of experience. Everything we’ve learned we’ve learned in the past. You’ve learned to talk, you’ve learned to walk ….you’ve learned it when? Not today. You’ve learned it years ago. So if you in a purely theoretical sense forgot all of your history, all of your experience, you would return then to foetal state of existence; to a state of immaturity; you would be reduced in your capacity to deal with current and present realities. Many of the coping techniques and things that you have learned in your past would not be useful to you because you would not have them at hand. The same thing is true then in the life of a people; we learned a lot of things as African people; we learned to cope with a lot of things; we learned a lot of methods and techniques for solving problems. The forgetting of African history, the not knowing of African history then, breeds in us a certain levels of immaturity and incapacities to deal with problems which confront us today.

So you see history is not just a game of remembrance. History is an instrument of power. And when you let another people (as I said earlier) falsify your history, they then will destroy your power and your potential as a people and your capacity to solve your problems as a people. So we’re going to be talking about this. We’re gonna talk about how European history’s mythology organized our mentality today as African people and how we have to see European history as a mythology and get a more correct and realistic knowledge of European history as a way of getting a more correct and realistic knowledge of ourselves and as a way of getting in control of ourselves. We are also going to talk about in that book a psychology. Why are we labelled as maladjusted and so forth? and why do we allow another people to place labels on us? Why do we let another people call our children learning disabled? Why have not we examined those definitions?

To a very great extent, the destruction of our children is taking place because we have accepted without opposition or critical analysis the definition of other people of their behaviour; A people who have falsified our history do not know the psychology of our children nor of us but yet who are arrogant enough to feel that they can label our behaviour and then impose programmes on them. You must understand, you see, the labelling of behaviour is not a mere designation of certain forms of behaviour but is a form of domination. So when you are permitted to label other people, you are also authorizing certain types of behaviour toward those people; you are authorizing the withdrawal of certain rights; you are authorizing restraints and constraints on their behaviour; you are authorizing, you see, the taking away of privileges and authorizing the imposition of all of kinds of punitive and other so called measures. So labelling children and labelling people’s behaviour is not something that should be taken easily; something that should be looked upon as truly the work of experts. As a people then we must regain the capacity to label our own behaviour and to deal with that behaviour within our own context.

Transcribed from lecture “History as an instrument of Power on: April 07, 2011, 04:23:27 PM » 

Tri-City Visionaries & Dagger Squad Meet with Community Leaders in KY  To Discuss Community  Crisis Planning 

On Saturday December 3, 2016 Monika Lamb of Tri-City Visionaries, LLC and Garfield Reid Founder of Dagger Squad LLC meet with the Louisville KY-Chief of Police  Steven Conrad & Other community leaders to discuss community & crisis planning. See Enclosed Video for details. The event was success according Inhert-herit-Shawn to in his Facebook post her writes

“Brother Garfield working the panel yesterday he had an excellent dialog as well as topic. I’m proud of the brother he could’ve waivered and let the chief off the hook but he stuck to the his points he got his information out and the way he did it was dope! Thanks my Brother continue the work we need you out here”.

This year we have seen the development  of fantastic organizations dedicated to community engagement and action in the concious community. Although each these organizations have  very different  missions,  all have made tremendous  strides towards transforming the community through grassroots planning. Its seems like everyone from, Tri-city Visionaries,  Dagger Squad , New Era-Atlanta and the African Action Coalition have taken the necessary steps to transform the community.

This is important accomplishment given the wealth, the Heath, sand educational gaps in the US. It seems that we are losing in every major category . Our children are suffering, our families broken, and our community are in shambles. With the new year, I challenge each of you to organize, support, and get involved in your individual communities. I challenge you to be proactive, take  initiative,  and engage in all 9 areas of human activity. We can’t sit idol and intellectualize as our children fall behind. There has always been strength in numbers and the only path to success is together. Let’s get organized!  Black African Power!! Kedric Smith of African ActionCoalition
Its Takes a Village

Nyah Amara

The Black Power Awards Celebrates Black Excellence In The Community.

One of the most important keys to restoring Black Excellence restoring a sense of community whereby we support, inspire, and celebrate the achievements of others. In many ways, the internet has prevented us from connecting  and establishing authenticate relationships based on mutual respect, honor, and accountability. Instead, it has encouraged hate, ridicule, and has become a safe haven for individuals looking  to minimize the achievements of others. In the past, we believed in community,  therefore we fostered relationships, we encouraged face to face contact, and we believed in good character and accountability. Today, it’s seems the internet has become a breeding ground for people suffering from internalized racism, mental illness, PTSS, and all sorts of character issues  looking to project their internalized hate to the world. If we haven’t learned anything from this cyber community, by default  we’ve learned to  appreciate the value of face to face contact, love, commandery, respect, and community engagement. All of  which, has always served as the backbone of our culture. This week,  let us step away from the chaos of the internet and break free from the hatred to reflect on what needs to be done. Let us reflect on the past and  identify ways to restore our heritage. This week,  let us take the time to reflect on the importance of relationships and communities. This week, let us celebrate the men and woman who have worked tirelessly to improve our community by educating us on our health, on condition as Africa people, and  educated us on ways to overcome racism and white supremacy. This week, let us celebrate those who advocate for social justice, education, and cultural rejuvenation.  This week, let us reflect on the community, the family, the men, the women, and the children who depend on us for answers. This week, let us reflect on solutions. This week, let us ponder on the wise saying  that half of being successfully is just showing up. Understanding that being in the moment has the power to change relationships, open doors, and restore broken hearts. This week,  let’s us take the time to be present in Atlanta and support the Black Power Awards. Remembering  the African Proverb “if you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together” . This week, let us network, celebrate each other, and acknowledge our accomplishments. This week, let’s us Support DJ and the Black Power Awards family as they acknowledge excellencey in the Black Community.

Peace

Nyah

Understanding The Difference Between Writing Scripts And Language

“The hieroglyphic writing originated in Egypt around 3,100 BC, at the birth of the First Dynasty, during the reigns of Narmer, Ka, Den, and possibly, Senedj. The hieroglyphic script was not borrowed from Mesopotamia. It was a domestic invention initiated and developed by the ancient Egyptians in their own homeland, on the banks of the Nile. From its origins, the writing system was equipped with a complete array of intellectual and technical resources: ideograms, phonograms, a writing medium, and scribal instruments.”-The’ophile Obenga African Philosophy The Pharaonic Period: 2780-330 BC.

The significance of this writing system developed in Ancient Kmt has sparked a series of debates among linguists. We have had some who refute it as the earliest writing system, others who refuse to allow Africans to be its owners stating it’s a copy of Mesopotamia, and the select few who says it’s been incorrectly deciphered many of them has never studied the writing system. 

The Hieroglyphs contains 5 different writing systems that existed from the old kingdom during three intermediate periods, late period, and a Ptolemaic era. Those writing systems are Hieroglyphic, Cursive Hieroglyphic, Hieratic, Demotic, and Coptic. During the Old and Middle Egyptian eras a total of 700 hieroglyphs existed, but after the Ptolemaic period at least 7000 different hieroglyphs now exist. “The ancestral Remetch referred to the hieroglyphic writing system as Ss mdw-nTr Sesh Medew Netcher- Inscriptions of Divine Words. It consists of pictures of the natural flora, fauna, and man made objects indigenous of the Nile Valley Corridor”- Wudjau Men-Ib Iry-Maat A Beginner’s Introduction To Medew Netcher.

There are four ways we can read the Hieroglyphs and they are: horizontal left to right or vertical left to right. The Hieroglyphs contain 24 monoliterals  25 if you count the double reed leaf as a monoliteral. Monoliterals are one letter words that also help make up what we call the Egyptian alphabet, and along with Bi-literals (2) letter and Tri-literals (3) letter consonants help make up the entire system. “Each sign used to write a given word generally serves one of the following functions: 1) Ideogram, 2) Phonogram 3) Determnatives. The signs that can perform each of the three roles, in different words of course, are relatively few.” Wudjau Men-Ib Iry-Maat A Beginner’s Introduction To Medew Netcher. Also the signs can function as Pictograms, Ideograms, Phonograms which deals with either a idea, sign, symbol or sound.

Hieratic writings are usually cursive and are always written from right to left. Demotic is a complicated script it derives from Hieratic and was used for religious text as well it can be written and read from right to left. Coptic has a Greek perspective using most of their alphabet and a few of the Egyptian alphabet as a blend to make up it’s writing system. Coptic came from the Egyptians who had recently adopted the belief system of the early AD period.

People who do not study the language or the writing system will continue to make the biggest mistake you possible can make by confusing one with the other. They are not the same and must not be treated as such. It is very important that we understand the language and the many different writing scripts which are involved with a particular time period. Language is supported by a writing script because it represents the voice and sounds expressed through communication by the way of thoughts and feelings.

“The language of ancient Egypt, in both its pharanoic and Coptic variants, is not an Indo-European language such as Hittite or Greek. Nor is it a Semetic language such as Akkaddian, Hebrew, or Arabic. Neither is it a Berber language such as Siwa Berber or Rif Berber.”- The’ophile Obenga African Philosophy The Pharaonic Period: 2780-330 BC.

In 1974 two of our best African minds entered a conference centered around the history of Africa and it’s owner of languages, history and much more. It was then the name Negro(black) Egyptian was introduced and proven to be the mother of all languages that come from under its umbrella. Two of the most organized Africans stole the show at the Unesco conference going against european minds who refuted the history of Black Africa. Comparative Linguistic studies by Dr. Diop, Dr. Obenga, Dr. Mboli, and a few other American African centered linguist have carried one another’s work an additional step throughout the years. They have all provided evidence that illustrate its historical breakthrough in parenting other African languages and it’s history. Ranykemet or Egyptian Spoken Language is not a dead language persay, Coptic is still being spoken til this day, and unlike the Hebrew language which once was a dead language the process of fully restoring it will take several years to complete. 

“When speaking of language in general, both the spoken and written forms are usually being referred, however, there are times when one or the other becomes the focus.” -Wudjau Men-Ib Iry-Maat A Beginner’s Introduction To Medew Netcher. As new languages are created different writing scripts will emerge that will support them. Since colonialism has soaked itself in grounds of the motherland a lot of what was has been lost. The root of culture is well within the confines of the language. In understanding the customs and practices of the ancestors we must first get rid of the influence of the colonizer, and restore the true meaning of a language that has been lost.

We as a people are so far removed from our native tongue and common practices we tend to not appreciate the beauty of our own language and writing script. To make false claims about translating the hieroglyphs only to turn around and tells story about the same hieroglyphs you’re saying can’t be translated is very hypocritical. With rigorous studies and applied understanding of methodology one can soon learn how to decipher the hieroglyphs with help.

References: Obenga, Théophile. African Philosophy: The Pharaonic Period 2780-330 BC. Popenguine: Per Ankh, 2004. Print.
Iry-Maat, Wudjau Men-Ib. “A Beginner’s Introduction To Medew Netcher – The Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic System Paperback – March 24, 2015.” A Beginner’s Introduction To Medew Netcher. Heka Multimedia, Mar. 2015. Web. 30 Oct. 2016. 

By:Ini-Herit Khalfani

November 7, 2016

Nashville, TN

<https://www.amazon.com/Beginners-Introduction-Medew-Netcher-Hieroglyphic/dp/0692411402&gt;.

Multimedia, By Heka. “Welcome to Mdw-nTr Community.” Mdw-nTr. Wudjau Men-Ib Iry-Maat, Jan. 2015. Web. 30 Oct. 2016. <http://www.mdw-ntr.com/membership/community&gt;.

Photos by: Wukitsch, Tom. “Unit 3: Egyptian Writing — Hieroglyphic, Hieratic, Demotic, Coptic.” Unit 3: Egyptian Writing — Hieroglyphic, Hieratic, Demotic, Coptic. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2016. <http://www.mmdtkw.org/EGtkw0300-Unit3EgyptianWriting.html&gt;.

“ANKH: Egyptologie Et Civilisations Africaines.” ANKH: Egyptologie Et Civilisations Africaines. Ankhonl, 2006. Web. 30 Oct. 2016. <http://www.ankhonline.com/obenga_th_bibli.htm&gt;.

Deciphermentsisu Follow. “Class 05 Champollion.” Class 05 Champollion. N.p., 27 Jan. 2011. Web. 30 Oct. 2016. <http://www.slideshare.net/deciphermentsisu/class-05-champollion&gt;.

Obenga, The’ophile. “EgyptSearch Forums: FYI.” EgyptSearch Forums: FYI. Asar Imhotep, 4 Apr. 2015. Web. 30 Oct. 2016. <http://www.egyptsearch.com/forums/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic%3Bf&gt;.

Economic Survival: Escaping Capitalism Racism and White Supremacy 

Before America was Ameria, it harvested the indigenous people who had no notion of an economy built on capitalism. What is capitalism one might ask?  According to Merriam Dictionary capitalism is,  “A way of organizing an economy so that the things that are used to make and transport products (such as land, oil, factories, ships, etc.) are owned by individual people and companies rather than by the government.” WEBSTER MARIAM. “CAPITALISM.” To understand capitalism we must understand the history. According to University of KMT press, an “Economic systems are different in history. Capitalism grew out of feudalism.” “Feudalism is a social system that existed in Europe during the Middle Ages in which people worked and fought for nobles who gave them protection and the use of land in return. WEBSTER MARIAM. “Feudal System.” Before capitalism, many people bartered which is engraved in the cultural traditions of people. The originators never valued anything outside its function or it’s need. Bartering catered to the necessity of the community meaning what one family couldn’t harvest or have access instead they traded amongst each other as it meets the needs of the entire community. What is a bartering? “According to Investment Answers, “Bartering is an exchange between two parties using goods and services for payment instead of currency.”

For centuries since being kidnapped and brought to the Americas, our ancestors have struggled to gain wealth and equality. After hundreds of years slavery and enriching the lives of others,  we continue to be shackled, and empty handed. Despite all our hard work and millions of hours of free labor,  Americas new economy “capitalism” has generated  a wealth system we have yet to become full beneficiaries.  A system that has proven catastrophic to our community as a result of economic castration preventing us from fully engaging in this economic system built by our ancestors.

According to Tdka Maat Kilimanjaro Yahra Aaneb in Bak2. “Economist say the Great Recession lasted from 2007 to 2011. In 2004, the median net worth of white households was $134,280, compared with $13,256 for black households, according to an analysis of Federal Reserve data by the Economic Policy Institute. By 2009, the median net worth for white households had fallen 24% to $97,860; the median Black net worth had fallen 83% to $2,170. In 2009, for every dollar of wealth the average white household had, Black households only had two cents.”‘

Many people believe we should compete in this capitalist society to fix our community, while others  disagree pointing to its past tracked record of  addressing the problems of  black social injustuce, racism, and white supremacy. However, Dr. Claude Anderson seems to accept certain aspects of the economy system, stating capitalism creates job. Dr. Anderson pointed out in his book that job creation was the first step in political empowerment. He encouraged us not to depend on the government for support and maintained that we have always been the losers of captlism a system built on inequality . “as 2nd class citizens for 500 yrs we got absolutely nothing, soon we will be 3rd class citizens, and in the future, we’ll be 4th class citizens. If we didn’t get anything as 2nd class citizens what make you think we will get something as 4th class citizens”. He encouraged us to create jobs, business and take social responsibility by creating programs that foster growth and community development. Dr. Anderson believed at the core of our success is the development of an independent economic structure, a code of conduct economically, and group economics. He also encouraged block voting, which he maintained took discipline and accountability.

Like Dr. Anderson, Dr. Amos Wilson took a similar approach. He Also believed Africans must maintain integrity economically, while understanding survival was the key to our growth and development. He suggested that short-term solutions and long-term initiatives could liberate us from the economic stronghold of capitalism. He stressed the European could not help us solve our problems.  “We create jobs, but we are not in a position to own that job that we created.” Tdka Maat Kilimanjaro of University of KMT press echoed these same beliefs in a similar way but placed emphasis on overthrowing the system using group economics stating we must “take advantage of All our resources.” All three scholars agreed that we should  pull our resources and then  develop a plan based on cooperative economics.

As  Africans living in American, we have to come to grip with our position and realize this was the hand we were dealt. We were kidnapped, and deprived of our culture, language, spiritual system, and identity. Therefore,  we must come together collectively to gain economic ground by setting an economic agenda. I read a study that stated we are 300 years behind in wealth compared to the majority. Take a look around at the wealth disparities in this country, predatory lending, and a look at all the new millionaires, all which that look like them.  Our leadership has failed. Our community lacks the same education opportunities faced with very few options other than Section 8, welfare, and minimum-wage jobs as a means of survival.

The states are high, and we must look critically and how we addressed these problems and ask how can we design an economy built for us, what would it take, what would it look like, how could it benefit everyone, what would keep the economy afloat?  All of these questions have to be answered, evaluated, and solutions must be designed based scientific methods  that focus on economic survival that are deeply engraved in the fabric of American culture. Once we can answer these questions and devise a plan,  we can then design a economy based on meeting the needs of our community. “We need a social/economic system that allows every person to have equal food, clothing, shelter, technical applied education. Second, we need the extraction and modernization of the very best of African culture–minus anything myths/mysticism forced on us by invaders.  Self respect, self-value, and self-reliance is the foundation of happiness. Justice is the basis of equality and freedom.”- Tdka Kilimanjaro Ife Kilimanjaro Bak2.

If we want to have our own “Pie”, we must create the best bakers on the planet. We must be willing to inherit the ideas of a Claude Anderson, mixed with Amos Wilson Black Power approach, and incorporate them with Tdka Kilimanjaro using nothing less than our best, brightest and wisest minds. This will take sacrifice among like-minded individuals who can incorporate and see things from beginning to the end. We have very little time, no time for finger-pointing or blame, and we must be willing to dedicate our lives to the liberation from the horrors of  500 years of systemic racism in America.

We didn’t come to America looking to build our families or looking to create financial freedom. Instead, we came naked, bruised and confused on boats full of urine, blood, mucus, disease, and death.  One by one, trip after trip we were captured against our will and thrust into an unfamiliar place to bend over backward to our death for the greater good of someone else’s dream. In return, we got absolutely nothing, not one red cent, not a pot to piss in or a window to throw it out of!

Everything we got we earned under very strict and harsh circumstances which we made the ultimate sacrifice to protect our women, men, and children from the oppressor. Capitalism was built on these sacrifices with the purpose of destroying our will to live. How dare we fix our problems,  how dare we accept this path for our children, and how dare we fight this economic bully that has created social, economic, and spiritual decay in our community?

We have to work hard and study the past to advance the future. But we must not only study, but we must also test our solutions, critique the flaws, and repeat the process to ensure our success. Then improve our existence by fostering relationships between like-minded individuals who are committed to advancing our sociopolitical position in society that was created to ensure we remained death, blind, and ignorant to the reality. In order to restore what was lost we must empower our people using strategies based on sound economic principles employed  when we were in the land of our ancestors.

Written

Shawn Phillips

Voices  of Fire

References: Tdka Kilimanjaro Bak2, Claude Anderson Powernomics book and lectures, Amos Wilson The Blue Print to Black Power lecture and book. Video references: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCQ9gh8EcY8  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4m4lY5IQZgQ

Photo Credit:  American Dream  Cartoons, Ashley Bradford

Editor: Nyah Amara

Highly recommend all three books

 

 

Dr. Sebi Dies of Pneumonia In a Honduras Hospital

According to Online social media reports http://secretenergy.com/news/the-official-story-of-dr-sebis-death/ Dr. Sebi passed away on Saturday, August 6th, 2016  due to complications of Pneumonia after spending the last two weeks in Honduras prison (See Update).”Dr. Sebi becomes sick with pneumonia while being held in prison. His condition escalated quickly, and he was transferred to a nearby hospital. We are unsure about what type of treatment he received over the course of the last few days, both before and After being admitted to the hospital”. Reports have surfaced that Dr. Sebi was arrested at a Honduras Airport and charged with having 37,000 dollars. The details of his death have not been confirmed by the family, but social reports have surfaced that Dr. Sebi was taken to the hospital after his cellmate noticed he was not breathing. He was transferred to a Roatan hospital located in the Caribbean 65k off the northern coast of Honduras where he passed away. It’s unclear why he was arrested given his worldwide notary and public profile, but his daughter vowed to seek justice. Honduras Prisons are some of the worse prisons in the world. With a Population of over 8 million people, the country is home to some of the most violent gangs in the world.

Dr. Sebi’s Legacy

Accordingto Dr Sebi website “Dr. Sebi was 82 years old at the time of his passing. He was an Pathologist, herbalist, and naturalist with  decades studying the plants and herbs of North, South and Central America, Africa and the Caribbean. His unique approach to healing the human body is firmly rooted in that experience. Born Alfredo Bowman in Honduras in 1933Dr. Sebi learned at the foot of his grandmother, “Mama Hay,” and later, in treating himself, with a traditional herbalist in Mexico. On finding the healing he’d sought, Dr Sebi created a line of natural vegetable cell food compounds used for inter-cellular cleansing and cellular revitalization”.Dr. Sebi used an African approach to disease that relied on what he dedication described as an” botanical remedies to cleanse and detoxify the body, bringing it back to a more alkaline state from the acidity that causes disease and pathology. Natural vegetable cell food compounds are an important part of that change. By removing accumulated toxins, and replacing depleted minerals, cell foods can rejuvenate damaged cell tissue, especially those eroded by acidity. The primary organs affected are the skin, liver, gall bladder, lymph glands, kidneys and the colon. With inclusive nutritional programs designed, not around the pathology, but around the whole person and their diet and health, cell foods are an important part of the nutritional environment of every recovering, responsible and healthy individual”. https://drsebiscellfood.com

 

Dr. Sebi was a Baba, father, friend, and mentor to us all. I’m personally devastated by his untimely passing, but encouraged to continue his work. My heart felt condolences goes out to the family and all those affected by this tragedy. Rest in Power.

Nyah Amara

Voices  of Fire